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also indicated to dr. brown in a general scholarly cents. his major publications include the gorbachev a factor published by oxford in 19967 years that changed the world in 2007 and most recently the rise and fall of communism published by aco in 2009. in addition to his work on political leadership and communist history and politics he has written on the end of the cold war and edited important encyclopedias and reference works on russia and the u.s.s.r.. these and many other publications he has been an on fittingly observer of the communist world in general and in russia in particular. his writings are distinguished by meticulous research, shrewd political judgments and admirable sensitivity to the experiences of the individuals living in the political systems he studies. his most recent book is a splendid piece of scholarship, rigorously researched and gracefully written. here is. i've already added to the list of required readings for students in the studies program. in short dr. brown gives social science or perhaps he would prefer to say social studies a good name. that is someth
in this research that we didn't know before and they both focus on mikhail gorbachev osb are coming to the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall i thought it would be timely to focus on gorbachev and how we learned some very important things about his role in this period, his role is the central to my story and in my book but i also felt that i discovered things that in all the previous year's we didn't know in definitely got a new understanding of what that role was. i think it is important to remember that gorbachev's achievements in ending the cold war, breaking what he called the speeding locomotive of the arms race of doubling the revolution in europe to one fold peacefully , ending the confrontation of the third world, these were not his first objective is. they grew out of his own desire for radical change at home. rooted in his own experience as a peasant, son, a young witness to world war ii, a university student during kifah, a party official in the years of stagnation and most importantly they grew out of his own deep impressions about what had gone wrong. corbett job did n
. and they boast focused on gorbachev as were coming to the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall i thought it would be timely to focus on gorbachev and how we learned some very important things about his role in this period, his role is central to my story and in my book, but i also felt that i discovered rings that in all the previous years we didn't know and definitely got a new understanding of what her role was. i think it's important to remember that gorbachev's achievements in ending the cold war, breaking what he called the speeding locomotive of the arms race, allowing the revolution in europe to unfold peacefully, and in the competition in the third world aired these were not his first object is. the crew out of his own desire for radical change at home are rooted in his own experience as a peasant, son, young witness to world war ii, the university student during the fall, a party official in the years of stagnation. and most importantly, they grew out of his own deep impression about what had gone wrong. gorbachev did not set out to change the world, but rather to save t
the changes. and part of the credit goes to gorbachev, who was trying to reform communism, and from the west, it wasn't just the hoa hardline. it was also the outreach, the support for democracy and the support for the helsinki accords and human putting human rights front and center in our relations with those societies. >> so you believe that really the cause originated within the soviet empire itself? >> well, of course. the first condition was the failure of communism. the second condition was the reaction among the peoples to that failure, which was to embrace democracy as the alternative. and the third condition was the reactions of various outside players. >> there was an op-ed piece that i wanted ask you about this weekend and it describes the last 20 years in eastern and central europe, continue says that it was an unprecedented success. give us your sense of how you think that life has changed polically and economically since the wall came down. >> when we look at the past 20 years, we have to compare what has happened not just4 with fantastic hopes for paradise on earth, because li
khail gor ba ch gorbachev crossed thborder, theyhanted gorby. they said glassnov, russian for openness, which many say is t reason for the fal of mmunism. >>> we thought it uld be interestg to look at how the soviets saw this. joininus, when the wall collapd, he was the chief of aff for t soviet ambasdor to the united nations. thank you very much for cong on the program. >> always an honor. >> so what was your reaction? what w the reaction ofour colleae that's were working with you athe soviet foreign minist when the wall came down? >> oh, the feelings were mixed. we had so many questions for our own leadership for theirole in the whole of events, in the chain of events, a too few aners. and basically the geral population in e soviet union en did not understa the role ofheir own leader, mr go gorbachev inll of this. althoughhere was always a sense of historic fairness to the gean nation beingreunited again, there was still a sens of t association being short-chand by the list again. >> well, gorbhev es remain wildly popular in the west forh of the berlin wl and the collapse of communis
to assume said i am more like clinton -- who tending gorbachev. -- putin then gorbachev. let's go ahead. credit in common, and i want to s -- read a comment, i want to ask a general question. i have many questions. i have been struggling to narrow it down. it is a question of three might want to weigh on. there are many disagreements. if we agreed that there is such a thing as a destructive moment or what, it is a punctuation a moment. two little questions follow. how do you know we are in one. i ask this for a couple of reasons. we choose the 1989. their questions about whether the bush administration and the cold government responded in the right way. the soviet union was still a round of 1991 was the big moment of opportunity. i am just highlighting the there is disagreement. how much of a turning one was 9/11? the bush administration overreached. they thought the world had changed more than it had. how you know you are in one of these? help you decide how much the way the united states has a? how much as the world changed in 1989? >> [unintelligible] i talk about how i'd talked abou
to gorbachev and said look, we are going to -- then he reaches out to tip o'neill. and he helps transform things with social security. >> by the way -- >> since working with reality which you must do. >> exactly. working with reality and standing firm here convictions but knowing where to find the common ground. whether it is with gorbachev or on the tax and the social security compromises that he and tip o'neill could do. that's what we are missing today. >> we have to take a break and we will be right back. >> on the health care bill, in particular, i think that in political terms if he backs away from that, he will deal with it because that's what people see in him. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the cadillac cts sport sedan. one of car and driver's 10 best for the third year in a row. ♪ and now, cadillac announces the new luxury collection lease. ♪ each year food executives come to grasse, france to work with roxane. here in this centuries old town cargill creates flavors. and food companies come to collaborate with cargill. creating unique tastes from thousands of rare flavors. helpe
to gorbachev and said, look, we'll use him. and then he reaches out to tip o'neill and helps transforms things with social security. >> this is working with -- this is working with reality, which you must do. >> exactly. working with reality and it's standing firm to your convictions but knowing where to find the common ground, whether it's with gorbachev or on the tax and the social security compromises that he and tip o'neill could do. >> we'll have to take a break. we'll be right back. >> on the health care bill, in particular, i think, frankly and in political terms, if he backs away from that, he will be lost because that is what people see in him. >>> final word, what should obama do from your perspective? what should he do? >> i think that on the health care bill, in particular, he should go back and say we need a health care bill. whether he revisits and then starts over again that ideal should not be lost? i think, frankly, in political terms, if he backs away from that, he will be lost because that is what people see in him. what is his presidency going to be? you know, we haven't ev
on which it occurs is significant because it happens early enough that gorbachev has enough time to determine the outcome. if it had happened after gorbachev possible plurality had fallen apart, there are a lot of what else. this is very significant. when i looked at the documents, i saw on that policy makers to describe what was happening used the language of architecture. james baker was talking about a transatlantic security architecture. i kept seeing these metaphors again and again. i decided to follow the lead and use that as the organization for the book. the way that i addressed the question of how to policy makers respond to the aftermath of these dramatic events? i decided to think about what happened after november, 1989, as an architectural competition. you had different architects proposing different the prince in a highly competitive fashion to try to succeed. if you went and architectural competition, that does not mean that you get to build anything. there is a long process of realizing your model. ambac thi saw four kinds of modt were at one point or another seri
sat down repeatedly with gorbachev and said let's find out what we have in common. that laid the ground for the end of the cold war. even though he was very much a conservative when it came to government issues, he sat down with a for a meal and found a compromise on social security -- tipper o'neill and found a compromise on social security. nowadays people do not know how to reach across. that is one of obama's's great strength. that is why he was elected president. i wish that people will allow him, sit-down with him on how they can find common ground. tavis: that entire notion of being bipartisan in changing the way of washington are not working out very well at the moment. >> no, it is not. look at health care. it is ridiculous. uni know, most of your viewers know, -- you and i know, most of your viewers know, we can agree, about 80% of the country, on what it will take to make health care better. but washington has become so polarized -- president obama, who said we should form a bipartisan approach, but it does not work. people are too polarized and partisan. i would h
. -- that he did speed it up. the nobel prize committee gave the nobel prize to gorbachev but not to ronald reagan. i thin that is one of the travesties of the nobel committee. 13 of facts that is. the idea that they worked together to end the cold war. -- there are two facts that contradict the idea that they work together to end the cold war. >> that have not been very many democratic leaders that have given up power, in my knowledge. >> the soviets gained ground against every american president from 1917 up until 1981. >> you clearly found an enormous amount. the going to become the martin gilbert -- are you going to become the martin gilbert of ronald reagan? martin gilbert has made a career of writing about churchill. >> being compared to gilbert would beat a great honor. >> is a very nice man. >another historian does have a lot of difficulty with reagan is morris. how is it that is competent historian did a biography of reagan and could not find enough and had to insert himself? the book was called "dutch." its been criticized by historians. the methodology was bizarre. >> most histor
the changes would not be happening were it not for presidents gorbachev's president and -- 0 presence and vision. we want to see his reforms in the soviet union succeed. and this -- mr. speaker, these methods were discussed by the european community heads of government at a very successful meeting in paris last saturday evening but -- at which disapproach received wide support. we all welcome changes in eastern europe and agree that the community should continue to give them every possible help. >> and the particular urgency of poland and's hungry's needs was recognized. the europe council in just over two week's time will decide on the additional help that the community can of. and carving not just financial help but further food supplies and training. and we shall also consider the possibility of extending european community programs, and in areas such as technology and education to eastern europe. and britain's recent suggestion of looking at various options for bringing eastern europe into closer association with the community will also be studied and discussed further. and at the
the gorbachev perestroika. it was very hard work to get there. as someone who had worked with the dissidents, i had been banned from the soviet union for years. i was not sure i would get a visa. i found this archive with great difficulty. it was freezing cold, there. there were nine folders of material. >> do you speak russian? >> i do. >> where did that start? >> that started in the british army. while i was in the british army, i had done rather well in languages at school. it is rather like the courses that were taught in monterey. the absurd thing is that i spent almost the entire time of my national service studying russian. i never used it in any practical way, but it changed my life. i then went to university and got my first degree in russian. >> where? >> at nottingham university. >> you were born in britain? >> yes. after working in the former yugoslavia, i came to graduate school at columbia and studied russian at columbia. although i went back to the u.k. after four years, it planted a seed. i published papers on censorship and came here to get circulation and to raise money for fo
would be the american and gorbachev. does that mean anything to battle? and if it does so by to get some reaction because to be a encapsulates a lot of what i have learned here today and yesterday that its declining power with a system that is extremely stressed andrea have to explain to our own people and the international community that we have to change. >> i don't know if he is gorbachev but nixon going to china is what i help because of the issues we have discussed. he will have to go that far and really come around. >> what do you mean really come around to? >> he will really have to put on the table to link the tough decisions we really have to take on entitlements in a big way and raise taxes and it is hard to say that. if we address this with ggp you have to break away from something of his own party members civic that is ripe for a crime not sure the question but it might mean that's he was a gorbachev in this sense of being a onetime president percy duty was to blame for their problems and he did not fix them or he is the one who said we have to face up to them and do the hard
found this? >> yes. this was during the gorbachev perestroika. they were beginning to make these things available but very grudgingly. it was very hard work to get there. as someone who had worked with the dissidents, i had been banned from the soviet union for years. i was not sure i would get a visa. i found this archive with great difficulty. it was freezing cold, there. there were nine folders of material. >> do you speak russian? >> i do. >> where did that start? >> that started in the british army. i was old enough to do a compulsory service. while i was in the british army, i had done rather well in languages at school. i did not want to learn russian. but i was sent to this training course which ended up in cambridge university. it is rather like the courses that were taught in monterey. the absurd thing is that i spent almost the entire time of my national service studying russian. i never used it in any practical way, but it changed my life. i then went to university and got my first degree in russian. >> where? >> at nottingham university. >> you were born in britain? >> yes.
at him. were you doing going out their meeting with gorbachev and setting new agenda is and trying to get rid of nuclear weapons? this is not what we thought we hired you to do but then the pendulum swung back under george h. w. bush that was extremely pragmatic with a tremendous sense of what needed to be done in the world to put together a coalition the likes of which we had never seen before in the history of the world to take on a specific enemy at a specific time and place and the neocons were all for that except he did not go all the way to baghdad and george hw bush felt he could not principally because it would have fallen apart so the new kinds went back into the habitual posture which was the greatest -- greatest criticize hours of foreign policy the world has ever seen. we do a terrific job of selling you the alternative throughout the bill clinton years. steadfast all through that time if you want to find an alternative way to look at the world and what ought to be done the neocons were there to provide it and only during george w. bush for the even able to come to the floor t
communist red. and, you know, gosh chetch actually runs an -- gorbachev actually runs an environmental group now. >> this one has just too much salt in it. it has cheese and bacon and hash browns and a pancake and eggs and sausage. i mean, too much salt. >> this isn't healthy. somebody should sue. it's almost 6,000 milligrams of sodium or the amount of salt you should have in three days. but guess what, piggy, pig, pig, pig? you don't have to eat it. >> i would say that serving the troops, you know, dinner was probably the best. but they didn't share. so they're off my holiday list. i would say ben stein and john bolton having a little chinese. >> ben, thank you for the chinese food. i actually thought of a reason why we should have chinese food. i'll share it with you here in just a second. might have a good idea to get your kids to speak mandarin chinese as soon as possible. >> this is bad luck? >> it is, to stick your chopsticks straight up and down. >> did you learn that at the u.n.? >> actually, i learned it at the state department. >> really? >> that was -- how many times did you sit a
was obama is going to be the american gorbachev. does that mean anything to do all? if it does i would like to get reaction because it encapsulates a lot of what i've learned here today and yesterday and that means we are declining power with a system that is extremely expressed and we have to somehow explain to our own people and to an international community we are going to have to change? >> i don't know if he is a gorbachev, i know i hope he's a nixon to china because it seems the issues discussed here is like nixon going to china he's going to have to go that far, have to come around. >> what you mean coming around? >> he's been to have to put on the table reduction during the tough decisions, john xbox, putting them in the box. we are going to have to take on entitlements in a big way. we are going to have to raise taxes it's hard to say that. but if we address this issue of 60% gdp he's going to have to break away from some of his own party members. >> i don't know quite what the questioner meant that it might mean he was a gorbachev in the sense of being a onetime president if it is
and legitimacy to the soviet union that eventually led to the efforts by gorbachev to both reform the soviet union but, in fact, bring its collapse to fairly rapid end. now, i want to now talk a little bit about some of the criticisms of kahn and answer some that "the essential herman kahn" brings out. the first is kahn the amoral physicist, the dr. strangelove. ken i think covered dr. strangelove elements pretty thoroughly so i won't repeat that but when you actually look at the movie and read kahn it's very clearly whether kubrick suspended it or not the underlying point of the movie re-enforces kahn's own point of view which is that the prevailing military strategy the prevailing nuclear military strategy that the u.s. had was absurd. whereas as he once famously said to the folks in the air force, gentlemen, you don't have a war plan, you have a war orgasm. [laughter] >> and by writing the book that he did, i think he directly and by talking about the doomsday machine as the paradoxical logical parity of that strategy i think brought far greater clarity of what the strategy ought to be al
of copies and there are some people and we are asking mikhail gorbachev to write a forward and first i felt this is interesting and then i thought is he really even the right person to write the foreword for this because in the way it all happened under him and he was like -- he may be didn't want what i read about him like he thought it's going to stop the soviet border so maybe it got out of hand because somebody said if you would know what will happen in the in which you have done probably not. and so not because of the history he thinks he was responsible for it so maybe he would act like a nice light and look what happened 20 years ago but maybe he is not the right person to do that. in korea and mexico don't the people -- it is amazing the consequences i just finished a book about the childhood of [inaudible] and i always knew the poems and he's a great poet but i completely -- because it is about his childhood is a very poetic book and then somebody said the duke realize he was a communist? how could you have done a book which is not in favor of communism and now we did a book about
. gorbachev, tear down this wall. >> our long national nightmare is over. ♪ america, america >> here's johnny! ♪ it's a autiful day in this neighborhood, a beautiful day for a neighbor would you be mine ♪ >> welcome to "the french chef." i'm julia child. today we're cooking goose. ♪ ♪ the way glen miller played, songs that made the hit parade ♪ ♪ >> you don't leave much when you miss, do you, fat man. >> that's what the game's all about. >> i could have been a contender. i could have been somebody. >> tell your men they work for me now. >> behold his mighty hand! ♪ i feel good i knew that i would now ♪ >> in football, you wear a helmet. in baseball, you wear a cap. >> that's right, that's right, we bad, uh-huh. >> that's the story of my life, no respect, i don't get no respect at all. ♪ thanks for the memories of rainy afternoons, swinging harlem tunes ♪ >> paul harvey. good day. >> good evening from the cbs news control center in new york. this is walter cronkite. >> all's well that ends well. my time here now ends extremely well. ank you. >> every time i look at a coin,
dismantling, no mention of ronald reagan or margaret thatcher or any other effort except communist gorbachev. do you see a problem in rewriting the history and why there has not been any resistance on our part to counter attack the efforts to rewrite what took place in the 1980's? >> i think that that is a very telling comment that you made. and it was a very telling incident did the president of the united states removes himself to copenhagen to bring home the chicago olympics. he removes himself to compensate for climate change. he removes himself to oslo to receive a prize. but he does not show up in berlin at the 20 it anniversary of an event of biblical proportions, one that i am sure most of this in the room would never have imagined we would ever see. that tells you how he sees the world and reinforces that quotation. i could use one of dozen, in which you can see his priorities. and to speak of the cold war as an arbitrary, and not to see how routed they were in the fundamental values of the united states and west, as cleavages and some obsolete conflict, it is simply staggering but
or margaret thatcher except communist gorbachev. so do you see a problem in rewriting the history and why there hasn't been any resistance on our part to sort of counterattack the efforts to rewrite what took place in the 1980's? >> i think that's a very telling comment you made and it was a very telling incident. the president of the united states who removes himself to bring home the chicago olympics, he removes himself for climate change and removes himself to oslo to receive a prize but doesn't show up in berlin on the 20th anniversary of an event of biblical proportions one i'm sure most of us in the room never imagined we would ever see. that tells you how he sees the world, reinforces that quotation. i could have used one of dozens. the one i used was from the general assembly where you can see his priorities and to speak of the cold war divisions as sort of arbitrary and not to see how rooted they were in the fundamental values of the united states as cleavages is simply staggering but it tells you a lot of his world view. and i thought the berlin event was very, very telling, par
, president ronald reagan and soviet leader mikhail gorbachev held a summit there. but some believe the civilian courthouse is the proper place for the terror trials. yus yusuf, mast as well as terroris were tried and convicted here. >> we should have trials and this is the place to hold them. this is where the crimes and the murders were committed. >> eric: the new york city police department is planning a security zone around the courthouse and says governor's island, that idea may not work but the day of tomorrow the community will vote on final resolution to try to move the trials, send the resolution to the attorney general, eric holder. and president obama himself. the fact people live so close we could see people working at their computers and drinking coffee. we looked in what we think is a federal courtroom and some of the folks waved back. >> jamie: good report, eric. good to know. president obama is facing the deepest economic downturn in decades and this week he delivers his first "state of the union" address. we will ask a former presidential speech writer what mr. obam
 will report on his meeting with president gorbachev. before that happens, i shall be meeting president bush at camp david later this week. the action of the right hon. gentleman, the leader of the opposition, is to see what is happening in eastern europe as yet another excuse to weaken our defenses by getting rid of nuclear weapons, even though they are a fundamental part of nato's strategy. because we have nato and have tech defense is strong, because we deploy cruise against the soviet union's ss20, because we convince the soviet union that it could never succeeded in intimidating are threatening the west, that we are now witnessing these great changes. mr. speaker, times of great change our great uncertainty and even danger. we have to be prepared for anything, however unexpected. events demonstrate even more conclusively that we are willing -- our nuclear deterrents are the collective security provided by nato. is the cornerstone of our defense. how we react to what is happening now will shape europe and the wider world for decades ahead. against a background of assure defense, or progr
that the torch has been passed.... >> mr. gorbachev, tear down that this wall. >> reporter: but in the longer view of history, how significant will this past year be? how will 2009 compare with other clearly consequential years? >> the forces of germany have surrendered to the united nations. >> reporter: will it compare, for example, to 1945, the end of a world war? >> the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> reporter: the death of the most powerful of men? the first of a weapon that would define the age to come. or how about 1968? >> give me some cover. >> reporter: at home, a war turned quagmire brings a challenge to a sitting president. >> and i will not accept the nomination of my party for another term as your president. >> dr. martin luther king, the apostle of non-violence in the civil rights movement has been shot to death in memphis, tennessee. >> reporter: the murder of the civil rights leader triggers violence in city after city. just a few months later, the killing of a potential president is followed by riots at a political convention to end all conventions. >> a police
nor margaret thatcher, nor any of that effort, except communist gorbachev was celebrated. mr. obama mention himself three times during his speech. so, do you see a problem in rewriting the history and why there hasn't been any resistance on our part to sort of counter -- counterattacked the effort to rewrite what took place in 1980s? >> well, i think that's a very telling comment you made. and it was a very telling instance, the president of the united states removes himself to copenhagen to bring home the chicago olympics. it removes himself to copenhagen for climate change. he removes himself to oslo to receive a prize, but he doesn't show up in berlin on the 20th anniversary of an event of biblical proportion, one that i'm sure most of us in the room would never imagine we would ever see. that shows you how he sees the world, reinforces that quotation. i mean, i could have used one of dozens. but the one i chose it from was the address of the general assembly, in which you can see his priorities. and to speak of the cold war divisions, sort of arbitrary and not to see how rooted
of that effort except that communist gorbachev was mentioned. do you see a problem in rewriting the history and why there has not been any resistance on our part to counter attack the efforts to rewrite what took place in the 1980's? >> i think it is a very telling comment you made. it is a very telling instance. the president of the united states removes himself to copenhagen to bring home the chicago olympics, removes himself to copenhagen for climate change, removes himself to oslo to receive a prize, but does not show up in berlin at the 20th anniversary of an event of biblical proportions one that i am sure most of us in this room never imagined we would see. that tells you how he sees the world and reinforces that quotation. i could have used one of dozens. you can see his priorities. to speak of the cold war divisions as arbitrary and not to see how rooted they were in the fundamental values of the united states of the west as a cleavages of some obsolete conflict is simply staggering. it tells you a lot about his world view. i thought the berlin event was very, very telling. leaving
not be happening without the courage of president gorbachev. we all have an interest in seeing his reforms in the soviet union succeed. these matters were discussed by the european community heads of government at a very successful meeting in paris last saturday evening. this approach received wide support. we all welcome changes in eastern europe and agreed that the community should continue to give them every possible help. the particular urgency of poland and hungary's needs were recognized. the european council in just over two weeks' time will decide whether additional -- what additional help the community could offer, not just financial help, but food supplies and training. we also consider the possibility of extending the european community programs in areas such as technology and education to eastern europe. we're looking but the various options for bringing eastern europe into closer association with the community. we will discuss this further in strasbourg. mr. speaker, at the same time we have worked with nato and the warsaw pact, and they continued to be the basis for defense b
of the summit between president ronald reagan and soviet leader gorbachev in 1988. the local community board believes governor's island would be a much better choice than the neighborhood. here's a reason why. take a look at what we're going to show you now. the windows of the federal courthouse you can see right from that apartment building from chatham towers. we went to a couple of the apartments and looked right out and you could look right into the courthouse. you see people we presume to be u.s. attorneys working on criminal cases. we can watch them drinking coffee and work on their computers. we worked -- looked into what we presumed to be a federal courtroom themselves at one point people even waved. one of the reasons why residents here including jeanne chin said the trial should not be here. >> people's lives are going to be altered this is bog to be an armed camp and our lives are going to be changed dramatically i hope president obama will reconsider when he understands densely packed residential buildings surround the court. i think the decision was not very well thought out. >>
and things to gorbachev they very quickly and quietly and said the country. and you're right, north korea does not have that. in part that's a testament to the staying power of the north korean regime even without foreign troops presence that they maintain their grip on power in a way that the east germans and other east europeans could not. but i'm not really sure what that really means. it's obviously one of the differences and why it's taken so much longer. there is one indicator of why it has taken so much water for the two periods but i'm not sure what else we can draw from that. >> andrew shepherded the state department. you said that to think unified korea it's assumed that we be pro usn maintain troop presence there. i think we want to know why you feel that that is so definitive. as part of that, if that were the case then you would suggest that a unified korea with u.s. troops moving up toward north korea would be something harder for china to swallow so assuming that's the case, what would tend to be looking for in reunification scenario that would make it easier for them to co
such as the 1988 summit between president ronald reagan and mikhail gorbachev. one resident we talked to, jenny chen, had this to say about the trial being held here. >> i think that being ideological idiots because it just doesn't make sense to put ourselves in the line of fire when other locations would be more suitable and would require less resources to protect. >> and you're basically talking about thousands of families, a very hot and contentious issue here in lower manhattan. jane: what's the reasoning, eric, about why lower manhattan wouldn't be the right place for these trials? >> well, this is the courthouse right here behind me. and, look, right next to it is an apartment building. 240 apartments are here just yards away from the courthouse. by my count this morning from one point, just 30 feet away. it's like having khalid sheikh mohammed right in your backyard. you look out the windows, and you can actually look into the courthouse very easily. just a few yards away. we saw who we presume to be u.s. attorneys perhaps working on criminal cases and the like. it is that close. as for
written. it is true that the russians were present when east germany fell. thanks to mikhail gorbachev, they quickly and quietly exited the country. you are right, north korea does not have that. in part that is because of the staying power of the north korean regime, that even without foreign troop presence, they maintain their grip on power in the wake of the east germans did not. -- in a way that the east germans did not. but i am not sure what that really means. one indicator of what it has taken so much longer for the two koreas, but i am not sure what else we can draw from that. >> andrew shepard, state department. he said that you think a unified korea -- you said that you think a unified korea, you assume that it would be pro-u.s. and would maintain the troop presence there. i wonder why you feel that is so definitive. as part of that, if that were the case, then it would suggest that a unified korea with the u.s. troops moving up towards north korea would be something that would be harder for china to swallow. assuming that is the case, what would china be looking for in the r
stood at the bradenberg gate in germany, shook his fist at russia and said, mr. gorbachev tear down this wall. we honor in a few days moo my fourth congressional district the man who said that, tear down this wall. today i say to the leader of another country, our country, mr. obama, your health bill and your 34 czars, tear down that wall that separates you from the american people. pull down your health bill and start over. the people have spoken, we need jobs not bribes and broken promises. pull down that bill. pull down that bill. pull down that bill. pull down that health bill. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from colorado rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. the gentleman from colorado. mr. perlmutter: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to honor catholic schools in my district and across the country for their contributions to their students and communities. jan 31 through -- january 31 through february 62010 has been designated as catholi
publicized and security-issued events happening there. in fact in 1998 president reagan and mikhail gorbachev held a summit there and last night the resolution including a suggestion that the trials be moved to governor's island, the residents of the neighborhood hoping that will happen, they don't have an answer yet. from officials. bill: eric, thanks, rudy giuliani was on fox earlier today an predicts that president obama will reverse that decision. almost saying it will happen soon. martha: yes, khalid sheikh mohammed will not have the trial here and we'll see about the other, sarah palin and senator john mccain back together again. the former alaska governor will campaign alongside the former presidential candidate in his home town of phoenix and senator mccain is running for his 5th term in the senate and going strong and in a statement to -- the senator said his ex-running mate energized our nation and remains a leading voice in the republican party. bill: looks like john mccain and his wife have different opinions when it comes to the issue of gay marriage. cindy mccain posed for a new
would not be happening were it not for president gorbachev's courage and vision. all of us have a strong interest in seeing his reforms in the soviet union succeed. mr. speaker, these matters were discussed by the european community heads of government at a very successful meeting in paris last saturday evening at which this approach received wide support. we all welcome changes in eastern europe and agreed that the community should continue to give them every possible help. the particular urgency of poland and hungary's needs was recognized. the european council in strasburg over two weeks time will decide on additional help that the community can offer. covering not just financial help but food supplies and training. we shall also consider the possibility of extending european community programs in areas such as technology, and education to eastern europe. britain's recent suggestion for looking at the various options for bringing eastern europe into closer association with the community will also be studied and discussed further at strawsburg. at the same time -- >> order. >> mr. spea
and gorbachev met to discuss political proliferation. why did they meet there? they met there because it was a safe and secure site. residents that lived there, there are a few workers. there's no subway, no transportation infrastructure. and the real problem with lower manhattan is it is such a high risk area. >> of course. >> we've got to remember it's the fourth largest commercial business district in the country. >> it's one of the stupidest thing you could ever propose. here's rudy giuliani yesterday on governors island and whether he thinks this thing is going to come off or not. >> i have a prediction. >> what? >> this trial is not going to take place in manhattan. the president is going to change his mind. >> well, julie? >> i hope he does. i don't think lower manhattan is the right venue. i think it's very problematic. i think it's high risk. everything is one of costs. the nypd is saying they're going to spend $200 million a year in security. we're talking about a multiyear trial close to a billion dollars in federal money for this trial. does that make sense in this eco
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